Archive for January, 2013

January 2, 2013  |  off

Infestations of crown-of-thorns starfish, which are large and destructive predatory creatures, have killed extensive areas of coral on the Great Barrier Reef of Australia, regions of the Andaman Sea bordering Thailand, and the western Pacific reefs. There has been much debate on whether such plagues are natural or are caused by over-fishing of the few mollusks and fish that can eat this starfish, such as the giant triton, Charonia tritonis.

With up to 20 arms and a formidable covering of long spines, the crown-of-thorns starfish has few predators. The spines are mildly venomous and may inflict a painful wound if the starfish is picked up with bare hands. Crown-of-thorns starfish feed on corals by turning their stomach out through their mouth and digesting the coral’s living tissue. Pure white coral skeletons indicate that this starfish has been feeding recently in the area. In popular diving tourism areas, attempts are sometimes made to kill the starfish by injecting them with poison or removing them by hand, but with only limited success.

Outbreaks of the coral-killing Crown of Thorns Starfish Acanthaster planci are intense disturbances that can decimate coral reefs. These events consist of the emergence of large swarms of the predatory starfish that feed on reef-building corals, often leading to widespread devastation of coral populations

You are currently browsing the http://imagineoceans.com blog archives for January, 2013.

"People ask: Why should I care about the ocean? Because the ocean is the cornerstone of earth's life support system, it shapes climate and weather. It holds most of life on earth. 97% of earth's water is there. It's the blue heart of the planet — we should take care of our heart. It's what makes life possible for us. We still have a really good chance to make things better than they are. They won't get better unless we take the action and inspire others to do the same thing. No one is without power. Everybody has the capacity to do something." Oceanographer Sylvia Earle

Connect With Us

Link to myFacebook Page
Link to myLinkedin Page
Link to myRss Page
Link to myTwitter Page